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FAQ

  • How do I know if I require a dietary supplement?
  • Dietary supplements includes many varying ingredients such as vitamins, minerals, herbs, botanicals and other substances. Some supplements may assist you if you are lacking certain nutrients by ensuring you gain the required amount of these nutrients. Dietary supplements may also promote an overall sense of wellness and increased performance.
    You should not self diagnose any health condition and dietary supplements are not designed to treat, prevent or cure disease. Sometimes dietary supplements may produce unwanted side effects so it is important to always contact your health care provider before undertaking a dietary supplement regime. This is especially true if you are taking any medications or suffer from a health condition.
  • How do I decide which supplements are best suited to my needs?
  • To decide what supplements you should be taken it is best to know what nutritional gaps exist in your diet. You can find out what these gaps are by talking to your health care provider.
  • Can I take too many or too much of a given dietary supplement?
  • Many supplements can be safely taken in amounts greater than the Recommended Daily Value (DV), however this should be done in consultation with a health care professional. The percentage daily value (%DV) seen on the label tells you what percentage of recommended intake amount for that nutrient is met per serving. When taking vitamins, it is important to follow the suggested use. If you are unsure about the amount you should be taken of a given supplement carefully review the precautions and instructions available on the label and consult your primary health care provider.
  • When should I take my supplements?
  • Most supplements can be taken with the largest meal of the day. Most supplements needed to be taken with food in order to optimize digestion and absorption. There are however some exceptions such as SAM-e so it is best to check with your healthcare provider.
  • Can I take supplements with my current medications?
  • You should tell your primary health care provider of any dietary supplements you are taken. Some dietary supplements can interfere with prescription medications and may cause them to be less effective. Speak with your doctor about the dosage and frequency of use of all your dietary supplements. SOme doctors may recommend you take a supplement if you are on certain medication as you may be lacking in specific nutrients.
  • Where can I access information about a certain dietary suppliment to determine if it is effective and safe?
  • The way dietary supplements are regulated is different to the way mainstream medicines are monitored. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not demand that dietary supplements be researched and tested on people to prove their safety and effectiveness before they are marketed, unlike for drugs. If the FDA finds that a supplement is unsafe once it is on the market then it can take action by for example issuing a warning or demanding that the product be taken off the market.
    You should not self diagnose any health condition and dietary supplements are not designed to treat, prevent or cure disease. Sometimes dietary supplements may produce unwanted side effects so it is important to always contact your health care provider before undertaking a dietary supplement regime. This is especially true if you are taking any medications or suffer from a health condition.
  • How do I know if the supplement that I purchased contains the ingredients that it claims on the label?
  • Although the FDA does not analyze the content of each dietary supplement it has issued a Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs) for dietary supplements. The GMPs is a set of requirements that outline the way in which dietary supplements must be prepared, manufacture and stored. The GMPs is designed to help prevent the inclusion of wrong ingredients, too little or too much of a given ingredient, possible contamination and the incorrect packaging or labeling of a product.
    The identity purity, strength and composition of dietary supplements are meant to be guaranteed by the manufacturers.
  • How can I compare the ingredients and doses in one dietary supplement with those from another product?
  • The DIetary SUpplement Label Database (DSLD) contains label information from thousands of dietary supplement products that can be purchased in the U.S. It can be used to find out about a specific ingredient in a dietary supplement, to examine the text on a label, or to look into a certain supplement manufacturer.
    In the U.S. who is responsible for overseeing the regulation of dietary supplements? The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is responsible for overseeing the production and manufacturing of dietary supplements. Under the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994, the dietary supplement manufacturer is responsible for making sure that a dietary supplement is safe before it is available on the market. The FDA is the organization that is responsible for intervening if any unsafe dietary supplement products reach the market.
    Who can I complain to about a particular dietary supplement? You should talk to your healthcare provider about any illness or injury associated with a dietary supplement. You can also contact the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
  • Can I take supplements after the expiration date?
  • A product may not necessarily be harmful to consume once it has expired, however, the active ingredients may no longer be effective or potent. It is best to discard all expired products.
  • Where is the best place to store supplements?
  • It is best to read the storage directions on the label. Generally speaking it is advisable to store your supplements in a cool, dry place. Always keep supplements out of reach of children and pets.
  • Can I cut supplement tablets in half?
  • If you experience difficulty swallowing a supplement whole then generally speaking it is safe to cut them in half, crush them or chew them. If you have a softgel tablet that is too large to swallow you can cut it in half empty the contents onto a spoon. Some exceptions include timed-release or enteric coated supplements.
  • Should I check with my physician or healthcare provider before taking a dietary supplement?
  • If you are pregnant, nursing a baby, or have a chronic medical condition you should always check with your physician, healthcare provider or pharmacist before taking any supplement. Generally speaking all people should check with their healthcare provider before taking any new dietary supplements.

Disclaimer: Victorious Elements website content is for informational purposes only and is not meant to replace the guidance of your licensed healthcare practitioner. Statements on this website have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Information and products are meant for general use only and are not intended to diagnose, cure, treat, or prevent any disease or provide medical advice. Any decision to use supplements to support your specific needs should be considered in partnership with your licensed healthcare practitioner. Any questions you may have concerning your use of drugs, medications, or supplements should be directed to your healthcare provider. Victorious Elements customer service representatives are not qualified to answer any medical questions and will refer you to a medical professional.